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18564 US-11, Watertown: View Location

Our Services

At New Century Podiatry we perform a variety of podiatric services right here at our location on US Route 11 in Watertown. Below are some of the services we offer.

Laser Treatment

Laser Treatment

At New Century Podiatry we use Cutera Genesis Plus laser technology, the most powerful Nd:YAG laser for toenail fungus and skin rejuvenation. GenesisPlus is the culmination of more than a decade of experience and one of Cutera’s most advanced Nd:YAG laser systems. The laser technology is used to treat a number of medical conditions including:

  • Verruca Vulgaris
  • Verruca Plantaris
  • Onychomycosis
  • scars

Patients with nail fungal infection can usually be cured between one and three treatments. Best of all the procedure is done right here at our office location, saving our patients not only the time of traveling to larger cities, but money as well. Our laser treatment services cost a fraction of what podiatrists in larger areas charge.

Diabetic Shoes

Diabetic Shoes

New Century Podiatry is proud to work with the Dr. Comfort brand to provide diabetic footwear and inserts to our patients. Dr. Comfort was founded in 2002 and is the worldwide leading provider of diabetic footwear. Dr. Comfort recognizes the need for STYLE, COMFORT and QUALITY in the therapeutic shoe industry. The Doctor Comfort footwear line includes diabetic shoes, prescription inserts, diabetic socks, slippers, sandals and compression hosiery.

The classic craftsmanship and sophisticated style of Dr. Comfort are desirable for anyone in search of the finest quality in a comfort shoe. Prescription diabetic footwear can help prevent more serious foot health complications that can arise as a result of diabetes. Medicare and supplemental insurance may reimburse for all or part of the cost of Dr. Comfort shoes and prescription inserts for diabetics who meet certain general criteria.

PRP (Plasma Rich Platelet) Treatment

PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) treatment is a revolutionary new treatment that has been used on world class athletes that relieves pain by promoting long lasting healing of musculoskeletal conditions. To create PRP therapy, a small sample of a patient's blood is drawn and placed in a centrifuge that spins the blood at high speeds, separating the platelets from the other components. The concentrated platelet rich plasma is then injected into and around the point of injury, jump-starting and strengthening the body’s natural healing process. Because a patient's own blood is used, there is no risk of a transmissible infection and a very low risk of allergic reaction.

Diabetic Wound Care

If you have diabetes, there's no such thing as a minor wound to the foot, make no mistake about it - diabetes and wounds are a dangerous combination. Even a small foot sore can turn into an ulcer that, if not properly treated, can lead to amputation. Most of these amputations could easily be prevented with proper foot care and wound treatment.

Foot Ulcers

A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound usually occuring on the bottom of the foot of patients with diabetes. Ulcers form due to a combination of factors, such as lack of feeling in the foot, poor circulation, foot deformities, irritation, and trauma. Vascular disease can complicate a foot ulcer, reducing the body's ability to heal and increasing the risk for an infection. Elevations in blood glucose can reduce the body's ability to fight off a potential infection and also retard healing.

Once an ulcer is noticed, seek podiatric medical care immediately. Foot ulcers in patients with diabetes should be treated for several reasons such as, reducing the risk of infection and amputation, improving function and quality of life, and reducing health care costs.

Ingrown Toenails

An ingrown toenail (also known as onychocryptosis) occurs when the nail grows sideways into the toe, and not outward. The result is pain in the side of the toe. The big toe is most commonly affected. It can be caused by any situation that interferes with the proper outward growth of the nail, such as improper trimming of the nail or incorrect footwear.

In some cases, the edge of the nail can be separated from the side of the toe. Padding is the placed between the nail and the toe to encourage growth in the correct direction. Many cases require surgical removal of the toenail. A new, normal nail then grows in over the next several months. Without treatment the nail may continue to grow into the side of the toe. This can lead to progressive pain or recurring infection. It is most serious in people with underlying medical problems such as diabetes or peripheral vascular disease.

Nail Fungal Infection

Fungal infection of the toenails (onychomycosis) occurs when a fungus infects the tissue underneath the toenail. The result is discoloration of the nail. Often the nail becomes thickened and raised. It commonly involves several nails simultaneously. It often occurs in people with persistent moisture in their feet, such as with footwear that does not allow air circulation or in those who perspire excessively in their feet.

The treatment for fungal nail infections usually involves an antifungal antibiotic. Apart from laser treatment, oral antibiotics are generally required to treat the fungus while new nail grows in. The medication needs to be taken for several weeks to months while a new, healthy nail grows in. Antifungal medications applied to the surface of the nail are not usually effective. In other cases, the infected nail is removed. Without treatment the nails can become very thickened, discolored and unsightly. In some cases, pain or infection can result from very thickened nails.

Athlete's Foot

Athlete’s foot (tinea pedis) is a common fungal infection on the skin of the feet. It causes itching, burning or scaling of the skin, especially between the toes or on the soles. It affects men more than women, and it becomes more common with older age. Excessive moisture and lack of airflow around the feet predispose people to infection with the fungus. To decrease your chances of contracting athlete’s foot, avoid walking barefoot in public locker rooms and showers, and keep feet clean, dry and in shoes that allow the feet to get air.

Usually an anti-fungal cream or ointment applied to the affected area for 2 to 4 weeks will resolve the problem. Depending on the severity of the case, the medication will be available by prescription. In certain cases, oral medications will be prescribed. Although uncommon, if left untreated, athlete’s foot can lead to cellulitis, a more serious bacterial skin infection of the foot that can spread up the leg.

Warts

Plantar warts occur on the bottom of your feet. Often they occur on the areas of the foot that experience the most pressure, such as the ball of your foot or the heel. Because of the increased pressure to those areas from walking and physical activity, plantar warts in these areas often penetrate deep into the tissue and can be very painful. Warts are caused by a virus known as human papilloma virus, or HPV. They can be spread in moist environments such as public showers, locker rooms and swimming areas, but not everyone who comes in contact with a plantar wart will develop one. We diagnos a plantar wart based on physical exam and description of symptoms.

If it id determined that your wart needs to be treated, the usual choice of therapy is salicylic acid, which when applied daily eventually softens the skin layers of the wart so that it can be peeled off. This process may take several weeks or months. Other treatment options for plantar warts include injection with medication, freezing them with liquid nitrogen, and removing them with surgery. Sometimes plantar warts go away on their own if left untreated. However, many warts can become increasingly larger and more painful and can begin to multiply into clusters of warts called mosaic warts. Walking and running will become difficult in these situations. Over time, some plantar warts can lead to a type of skin cancer.

Bunions

A bunion occurs when the joint at the base of your big toe becomes enlarged, sore and swollen. Your big toe may start to angle toward your second toe, or move underneath it. Women are most affected by bunions, which are often caused by wearing narrow, tight shoes, or high heels. A bunionette occurs on the other side of the foot, near your small toe, and is much smaller than a bunion. Bunions can usually be diagnosed during a physical exam. An X-ray may provide further information about the joint, the angle of the toe, and if arthritis or gout are concerns to further investigate.

Wearing comfortable shoes with a wide toe-box at the first signs of a bunion appearing can decrease its growth and reduce any further complications. Resting the foot, using anti-inflammatory medications and icing the area may help. In some cases a cortisone shot at the base of the big toe may help. In cases when the bunion is causing severe pain, surgery may be performed to remove the bony bump and to realign the toe. Ignoring a bunion will lead to increased pain and the chance of contracting bursitis, when the small fluid-filled sac next to the joint becomes inflamed. Depending on how severe your bunion is, your foot can become deformed and continue to cause chronic pain.

Calluses and Corns

A callus, or tyloma, on the foot is caused from repeated pressure and friction, leading to the build up of thickened skin. The callus, which be may hard, dry or cracked, acts to protect the area underneath it. A corn is similar to a callus but is smaller and appears on toes rather than on the sole of the foot. Over-the-counter treatments such as pads or pumice can be used to decrease the calluses or corn. In severe cases calluses may require regular shaving to keep them from becoming too large.

While treatment for calluses and corns is not always necessary, it may provide you with more comfort. Larger calluses can cause significant pain. In some patients, especially when they become cracked, calluses can lead to wounds that can lead to serious problems, especially in people with diabetes.

Hammer Toe

A hammer toe is a toe that is deformed, with the end of the toe bending downwards. It usually affects the second, third or fourth toe, and appears to look like a claw. A corn may form on the top of the toe, and a callus may form underneath it. It may be caused by a muscle imbalance or by poorly fitting shoes, when toes are unable to be fully extended. A flexible hammer toe can be manually straightened out while a rigid hammer toe cannot be pulled straight. A physical exam will confirm the presence of a hammer toe. An X-ray can show more about the patient’s specific condition.

Treating a hammer toe before it becomes “fixed” in position is essential. Orthotics, splints, or wearing shoes with roomy toe-boxes may help non-severe cases of hammer toe. In severe cases, surgery may be performed. Without treatment pain and walking difficulty may increase, and a permanent deformity may occur. Repeated friction to the tip or the top of the toe can lead to wounds and infection.

Neuromas

A neuroma is thickening of the tissue surrounding a nerve that travels between the base of two toes. It is caused by repeated mild injury to the space between two toes, which can occur when footwear does not fit properly or in people that run frequently. The thickened tissue then causes pain in this area, especially felt when walking.A neuroma is first diagnosed based on the history of the type of pain someone is having. There are also ways to examine the foot that can diagnose this condition. In some cases an MRI is done to obtain pictures of the tissue in the foot.

The simplest form of treatment involves wearing shoes that allow the feet plenty of room on the sides. In some cases an injection can be given into the neuroma. In difficult cases surgery can be curative. Without treatment The pain caused by a neuroma can progress and become severe.

Sesamoiditis

The sesamoid is a small bone under the ball of the foot. It can become strained in repetitive activities that place pressure on the ball of the foot or involve repeated upward flexion of the big toe. Sesamoiditis is inflammation and pain as a result of this. The diagnosis of sesamoiditis is made based on the location of the pain and on the type of activities that make it worse. There is also pain when pressure is applied to the sesamoid, especially on the inside part of the ball of the foot.

Treatment involves primarily rest. Special footwear with a rigid sole that minimizes movement of the joint at the base of the big toe may also be prescribed. In some cases a steroid injection along the sesamoid is given.Without treatment pain may increase. In some cases the sesamoid can become fractured. In severe problems that involve the seasamoid the bone itself can be surgically removed.

Foot Ulcers

Patients with diabetes are prone to the development of foot ulcers. After years of elevated blood sugar, both nerves and small blood vessels in the feet are damaged. Patients therefore do not feel small injuries occur, and damage to the circulation predisposes people to the development of wounds that may not heal. Diabetes also affects the immune system, leading to an increase chance of infection of foot ulcers.

Because pain from infection or enlarging of an ulcer might not be felt, diabetic foot ulcers need to be closely monitored for progression or infection. Calluses on the foot or around the wound should also be monitored regularly and treated when necessary. In some cases, alterations can be made to footwear to promote healing. Topical medications can be applied to encourage wound healing. Without treatment diabetic ulcers may become deep or infected. In cases of bone infection, long courses of intravenous antibiotics may be required. In some cases amputation of the affected toe may be necessary.

Charcot Foot

Charcot foot is a chronic foot condition that is found in conditions that cause loss of sensation in the foot, most commonly diabetes. As a result of the loss of sensation, the foot is unable to maintain its normal structure, and the bones of the foot and ankle collapse. The result is pain and inflammation. Over time, the bones and joints of the ankle can become damaged, and lead to chronic pain and ulcers on the feet.The diagnosis of Charcot foot can be made on the basis of loss of normal shape and structure of the foot and ankle. This can bee seen on physical exam, and demonstrated by X-ray or MRI.

Ideally, the treatment of Charcot foot includes treatment of the underlying condition causing the loss of sensation. During acute pain, the foot can be immobilized and anti-inflammatory medication can be taken. Measures are taken to maintain the proper shape and weight bearing of the foot and ankle. Without treatment, as Charcot foot progresses, chronic ulcers can develop. These are painful and can lead to infection.

Gout

Gout is painful inflammation of a joint as a result of build up of crystals within the joint. The crystals are made of uric acid, a substance that is found in many foods and usually excreted by the kidneys. People who produce too much uric acid, or whose kidneys do not excrete it enough, are predisposed to the development of gout. When the levels of uric acid in the blood are high enough, it begins to collect as crystals in joints which leads to pain and swelling. Gout most often affects the base of the big toe, but can affect any joint. It tends to recur in repeated attacks of acute inflammation. The diagnosis of gout is often suggested on the basis of the history and physical exam. A sample of joint fluid can be obtained with a needle and examined under a microscope. The urate crystals can then be seen. This is also the best way to make sure the joint is not infected, or inflamed due to another condition.

Acute attacks of gout are treated with anti-inflammatory medications. Sometimes a steroid injection is given directly into the joint to relieve pain and swelling, or steroids are taken orally. Colchicine is a medication that can help an attack of gout resolve faster. Some patients then take a daily medication to decrease the level of uric acid in their blood to prevent attacks of gout. Without treatment, repeated attacks of gout tend to last longer, and the pain may not go away entirely. Eventually the bones of the joint can be damaged, and large collections of urate crystals can accumulate under the skin and cause nodules.